How to pick branded colors for your social media images

What is color branding on social media?By Paula Wethington / @WethingtonPaula

If you hire a consultant to help with personal or business branding, or purchase a premade branding package, the services will likely include a style sheet or branding board that showcases a selection of colors.

That being said: maybe you are in a do-it-yourself situation for your “look,” and the design concept has become overwhelming.

Don’t skip the color palette decisions.

You’ll love the results when you can pick up a carefully selected crayon box, so to speak, and start using it on a project.

Here’s how I ended up with my choices of dusty rose, off black and complementary colors. As you’ll see, it’s not the first range of colors I had in mind.

1. Set up an idea board on Pinterest

When I decided to give color branding a try, I created a board on my Pinterest account called “color theory,” where I pinned a huge collection of articles and infographics about the use of color in design.

Along the way, I pinned color palettes that struck me as interesting.

If you hire a designer, he or she may suggest as part of the process that you build an idea board on Pinterest so they can understand the direction that represents “you.”

Did anything strike me as “that’s it!” right away? No.

As a result, I went in another direction for research:

2. Use Canva’s color palette generator

You may have heard of Canva, or already use it to create social media graphics. But this particular tool is a terrific feature on its own merits:

Go to Canva color palette generator and upload your logo or a photo that represents the look you want. See how the color range settles out. Do you like it?

I had a lot of fun playing around with this site.

When you seem to be going in the right direction, get a screenshot and / or write down the hexcode numbers on the color bubbles. You’ll use those hexcodes as a reference point at the next step.

3. Make some sample images

Now adapt an idea from the designers and create a simple infographic in your favorite graphic design program to be your “branding board.” This image displays the colors and fonts for your branding look, accompanied by any patterns or inspiration images.

Although you can save preferred colors in some programs once you get going, how do you find and replicate that exact shade to begin with?

The color hexcode from your designer or the generator tool is the key.

5. How do your colors work in real life?

Because I felt overwhelmed with choices I saved on Pinterest, I started my personal brand color efforts spinning off my recent business photos!

I thought my teal blue blazer could be a great signature color and the Canva palette generator came back with this range:

Canva color palette generator example

But after using it for about 20 to 30 images, I decided I really didn’t like this combination at all. It wasn’t “me,” despite the fact I look terrific in that blue blazer.

6. Keep experimenting.

I finally decided I wanted a dark red, dusty pink, and dusty purple as my core colors; with off white and off black as the neutrals. They are feminine and creative, but not too trendy. My teal blue business jacket looks fine with that color range; as do other fashions I tend to wear.

After I made a couple dozen graphics with this palette for my social media accounts, I realized this was right combination. But I needed a few more colors. I don’t like a¬† “monochromatic” look.

I took another look at my Pinterest board, to see what choices I had saved as “likes” that might blend in. With that review, and some cross referencing on the palette generator, I picked shades of navy blue, purple and tan to include in my collection.

The result: version 2 of my branding board.

paula branding board v 2

You can see the results by looking over my Instagram and Pinterest accounts, as using branded colors on social media images is a huge trend on both networks.