A social media manager’s checklist

Read this post for a list of things to do on a daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly and annual basis to keep social media accounts running at their best.

By Paula Wethington

Do the social media checklists you’ve found on blogs and Pinterest not fit what you really need to do to get the best results on your accounts?

Try this routine – it’s what I’ve settled into while running newsroom and personal brand accounts on various networks for several years. You’ll find a PDF version available for download and printing at the bottom of this file.

Daily

COMMUNITY

  • Look for tweets among people you follow or have listed that you could retweet.
  • Look over who recently followed you on Twitter. Block all spammers. Follow back the accounts that are your target audience, colleagues or provide useful content.
  • Check all accounts for messages / DMs/ comments you should reply to.

CONTENT

  • Write and schedule the daily content count goals that were previously agreed upon for your accounts.
  • Decide how you can get the most social media impact out of each piece of content through social media links, repeated tweets, shares, timing, reformatting, repurposing.
  • Look over the trending topic lists on Twitter, Facebook and the news headlines for topics that could be of interest to your audience for “real time” discussions and links. A fun example: snow days. Also monitor the fast-moving trending topic lists for clues of when you should pull or postpone your content schedule as your audience won’t be in the mood for it or the timing could be seen as insensitive.
  • Look over some of the pages your Facebook pages follow to see what content could be given a like or share by you.

Weekly

COMMUNITY

  • Run ManageFlitter or a similar third party tool on your Twitter accounts to find inactive accounts and unfollow them.
  • Pick an active account you are following on Twitter. Look over who they are following to find 10 to 20 people you also should be following.

CONTENT

  • Write and schedule the content that was previously agreed upon for your accounts on a weekly basis.
  • Look ahead on your editorial calendar for topics you should spend additional time working on. Perhaps an article needs a simple infographic to get attention on social media? Perhaps you need to coordinate with co-workers who will do what on a shared project?
  • Look for trending topics on Pinterest and Instagram. Even if those two are not your key networks, you can apply what you see here to your other networks.

EDUCATION

  • Read at least one article on social media and related topics.
  • Participate in the conversation of a social media managers community such as a Facebook group or LinkedIn group.
  • Use Facebook’s “pages to watch” function to look over what content has been doing well on competitor, friendly or comparable pages; and review the number of their likes and engagement rate. Is there anything you can pick up on as a case study or idea?

METRICS

  • Get the Facebook week to week page fan count numbers and put them in your spreadsheet or database. (Hootsuite and likely other social media management tools will do this for you, or you can just pick the same day a week to pull the numbers).
  • Look over the Twitter analytics on each account to see what you can learn about content choices and best timing for your audiences.

Monthly

COMMUNITY

  • Run the search tools in ManageFlitter on the Twitter accounts to search for people you didn’t know were there but should be following.
  • Look over your curated Twitter lists. Are some contacts out of date, no longer needed? Would a new list be helpful to watch the conversations on another topic? Did someone put you on a list that would be worth subscribing to?
  • Find Facebook pages to add to your news feed that might provide content you will find directly “shareable” to your pages.

CONTENT

  • Write a blog post in your area of expertise.
  • Find social media accounts to follow on Pinterest and pin links to your favorite social media content. Pinterest is a great place to find blog links and infographics on social media topics ranging from best posting times to how to design themes.

EDUCATION

  • Pick a new idea, strategy, tool or tactic you’ve learned about and give it a try. Does that content approach or timing work on your accounts? Is that subscription service worth the money?

METRICS

  • Get the month-end or month-start numbers on your key social media accounts. The weekly and quarterly are probably more useful for consistent date ranges; but monthly can be helpful for year to year comparison.
  • Is it working to set up certain accounts for automatic shares (such as If This Then That formulas) or do you need to post to each account separately?

Quarterly

COMMUNITY

  • Look over your LinkedIn profile to make sure the information is current and includes recent projects.
  • Are there coworkers or colleagues who are on LinkedIn but you overlooked making connections with them? Send a request.

CONTENT

  • Hit the content counts that were previously agreed upon/ requested for your accounts.
  • Look through your Pinterest collection and delete expired pins, dated content, board topics you are no longer interested in.

EDUCATION

  • Take an online class, watch a webinar, read a book or attend a conference on social media and related topics such as marketing, content writing, Search Engine Optimization so to pick up a new skill or learn how something works.
  • Review the notes or downloads you have saved from a previous class to refresh your memory on those lessons or concepts.
  • Run the Likealyzer tool on your Facebook pages and see what that algorithm says about how to get the page to perform better.

METRICS

  • File any quarterly reports that are requested in house or by your clients.
  • If you don’t do month-end numbers on all accounts, you should do them quarterly.

OPTIMIZATION

  • Look over every tab and section on the administrative side of the Facebook pages you manage. Is the “info” page correct and current? Are there former admins who should be deleted? Do you want to set preferred audiences? Do you have a verified check on that page, and if not, is it possible to apply for one?
  • Have you discovered fake, unofficial or abandoned Facebook pages or places that are in your company’s name and followed the procedures to claim/ delete or report them?

Yearly

BRANDING

  • Conduct a detailed review all of your accounts. Are the profiles, avatars, screen names, cover images, etc. consistent in approach and style so that someone who knows you on one platform will immediately recognize your account on another?
  • Do your profile and call to action links lead to working pages?
  • What colors, fonts, filters and tone of voice will you use on each account? Have you created a stylesheet with notes such as the hexcode?
  • Research the current recommended sizing list for each social network image you need to create such as a Facebook event cover.

CONTENT

  • Define your target audience – keeping in mind the demographics of your audience may be slightly different on each social network. What topics are they interested in? How can your social media content fit in with their conversations? Brainstorm ideas you can use as a reference when planning content for the next few months.
  • Do the research as to what the content counts should be for the social networks you are active on and the size or content of the account. Does the existing schedule called for by a previous social media manager or your client / business make sense? If so, set up your spreadsheet or checklist accordingly. If you want to change the schedule, be prepared to explain why there will be changes.

EDUCATION

  • Write and save instructions on each account to assist those who would need to fill in for you on days off such as vacation. What is the content schedule for that account? What topics seem to generally do well? What tends to be the frequently asked questions in the community?
  • What is your budget this year for continuing education classes in social media? Should you be looking at an indepth program to get the basics, or would short courses on specific topics be more helpful?

METRICS

  • Pull the Jan. 1 fan counts on all social media accounts you manage, and also pull the previous year’s numbers. You want those numbers for Year To Date comparison reports.
  • Decide what metrics you will track and report throughout the year, how often and to whom.

The PDF version:

Social Media Manager’s Checklist

I also post social media tips and strategies on Twitter at @WethingtonPaula and on my Pinterest account.

This post was written in December 2016 and updated in May 2017.

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